Historically inspired corset

Wednesday, 25 August 2010

This corset was first inspired by the work and research that went on during my project with Lili-kad photography. Several original victorian corsets came up during the initial stages and a number of ideas were jotted down in my design diary for future reference. One of the concepts that I liked the most was a removable flower corsage and I just love the way that really old corsets look so beautiful, even aged and worn, they have a beauty that new corsets struggle to replicate.

Some of the techniques that I have been working with recently sent my mind back to those quickly scribbled notes.

I spent a few days preparing the main fabric before finally deciding on the trim, I had two that jumped right out at me and begged to be made but this was the closest to my first vision and I can work with the other trim soon.

The corset is fully steel boned through out and the two part eyelets are set in to re enforced double boned channels for support when tight lacing.











www.boundbyobsession.co.uk

Tuesday, 24 August 2010

This has to be one of my favourite wedding corsets from 2010. The customer came to me with a concept in her head of the look she wanted to achieve with her wedding gown. and Having found a gorgeous, handmade, tuile skirt in just the right colour from Allie J Designs, she needed to complete the look with just the right corset. Her ideas were beyond gorgeous and there was no way to buy such a garment without having it custom made so armed with a sketch and exact specifications, we set to work creating the vision in her mind. We had a few emails discussing various elements. The keywords for the overall look of the garment were 'ethereal', distressed and 'elegant' using natural/coarse linens.

A few months earlier, I had experimented with a range of fabrics in my design diary, which were originally intended as a base for an embroidery project. Although these initial investigations created some beautiful results, they were incomplete and none were quite elegant enough. So I set to work a fresh. The beautiful thing about the skirt was how the colours, fabrics and effects blended so perfectly, so I really needed to make sure the corset melded/harmonised seamlessly into/with it. Destroying fabric is easy, distressing it elegantly is a little trickier!

Design diary entry


Having a huge collection of vintage and rare trims available in the studio is such a blessing for any project, but particularly for ones like these. It gives me a lot of scope to play around with their placings and to find the most perfect match. It can be down to the smallest element to make the look a success, each piece has to be correctly positioned to get the best effect.

My next concern was the blending with the skirt. It helped that I was sent extra tuile to colour match exactly and to use in the corset to tie the look together.
The idea from the start was to have strips of fabric hanging off the corset over the skirt making it look like one complete gown. Too many strips may have detracted from the overall elegance and from the skirt itself which was so gorgeous in it own right, not enough and the effect wouldn't work properly. As I didn’t have the skirt to work with, I had to use a couple of tricks to gauge if I had it just right. There was a lot of standing and staring, adding a bit, stepping back, moving it over, stepping back, taking it off again, stepping back etc... The pieces had to be just right. A few thin ribbons looked balanced: too many made it lose its beauty, too wide made it look bulky.


At this point it was easier to see the effects by working on the mannequin, I chose an ivory taffeta under-skirt (black had too much contrast and couldn't show the effect that I wanted to see, whilst white was the opposite), the completely different texture of the taffeta along with its sheen was a perfect contrast to the matt fabrics allowing me to see how the effects were working without compromising the look.




The final detail was the top trim. This element can completely change the look of a garment and is one of the things that needs to be picked quite carefully. After looking at many different options we both decided on the guipure lace. It complemented all the other features and with the addition of some pearl-beaded gymp trim it was perfect.
A few months earlier, I had experimented with a range of fabrics in my design diary, which were originally intended as a base for an embroidery project. Although these initial investigations created some beautiful results, they were incomplete and none were quite elegant enough. So I set to work a fresh. The beautiful thing about the skirt was how the colours, fabrics and effects blended so perfectly, so I really needed to make sure the corset melded/harmonised seamlessly into/with it. Destroying fabric is easy, distressing it elegantly is a little trickier!